The Fly-Fisher's Entomology

Alfred Ronalds The Fly-Fisher's Entomology
Alfred Ronalds The Fly-Fisher's Entomology
Alfred Ronalds The Fly-Fisher's Entomology
Alfred Ronalds The Fly-Fisher's Entomology
Alfred Ronalds The Fly-Fisher's Entomology
Alfred Ronalds The Fly-Fisher's Entomology
Alfred Ronalds The Fly-Fisher's Entomology
Alfred Ronalds The Fly-Fisher's Entomology
Alfred Ronalds The Fly-Fisher's Entomology
Alfred Ronalds The Fly-Fisher's Entomology
Alfred Ronalds The Fly-Fisher's Entomology
Alfred Ronalds The Fly-Fisher's Entomology
Alfred Ronalds The Fly-Fisher's Entomology
Alfred Ronalds The Fly-Fisher's Entomology
Alfred Ronalds The Fly-Fisher's Entomology
Alfred Ronalds The Fly-Fisher's Entomology
Alfred Ronalds The Fly-Fisher's Entomology
Alfred Ronalds The Fly-Fisher's Entomology
Alfred Ronalds The Fly-Fisher's Entomology
Alfred Ronalds The Fly-Fisher's Entomology
Alfred Ronalds The Fly-Fisher's Entomology
Alfred Ronalds The Fly-Fisher's Entomology
Alfred Ronalds The Fly-Fisher's Entomology
Alfred Ronalds The Fly-Fisher's Entomology
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The Fly-Fisher's Entomology

150.00

Alfred Ronalds | London: Longmans, Green & Co, 1868.

Book in very good condition.

Hand colored frontispiece and 19 hand colored plates

The Fly-Fisher's Entomology is the archetype fly-fishing how-to book. Most fly-fishing historians credit Ronalds with setting a literature standard in 1836 that is still followed today Describing methods, techniques and, most importantly, artificial flies, in a meaningful way for the angler and illustrating them in colour is a method of presentation that can be seen in most fly-fishing literature today. As the name implies, this book is mostly about the aquatic insects—mayflies, caddisflies and stoneflies—that trout and grayling feed on and their counterpart artificial imitations. Less than half the book (chapters I–III) is devoted to observations of trout, their behaviour, and the methods and techniques used to catch them.

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The Author of this little work entreats that it may be considered and judged of as the labour, or rather the amusement, of an amateur; whose chief object has been to facilitate to the Tyro in the art, the making and choice of artificial flies, on a plan of elucidation derived from personal experience. Having himself sorely felt the inadequacy of mere verbal instructions to enable him to tie the natural fly correctly, or even approximately, and the little utility of graphical illustrations unaccompanied by the principal requisite, viz. colour, he has been induced to paint both the natural and artificial fly from nature, to etch them with his own hand, and to colour, or superintend the colouring of each particular impression...