Some Flowers

Some Flowers Vita Sackville-West
Some Flowers Vita Sackville-West
Some Flowers Vita Sackville-West
Some Flowers Vita Sackville-West
Some Flowers Vita Sackville-West
Some Flowers Vita Sackville-West
Some Flowers Vita Sackville-West
Some Flowers Vita Sackville-West
Some Flowers Vita Sackville-West
Some Flowers Vita Sackville-West
Some Flowers Vita Sackville-West
Some Flowers Vita Sackville-West
Some Flowers Vita Sackville-West
Some Flowers Vita Sackville-West
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Some Flowers

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Vita Sackville-West | London: Cobden-Sanderson, 1937.

Dust jacket in Good condition with some yellowing and staining consistent with age. Book in Good/Very Good condition. 

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IRIS RETICULATA: When flowers come so thick in summer that one hesitates which to pick among so many, one is apt to forget the bare cold days when earth is a miser offering only one or two, take it or leave it. Wrapped in mufflers and overcoats we go and peer about for a stray sprig of winter-sweet, splashed and muddy hellebore, a premature violet,--anything, anything to fill one solitary glass with some pretence of spring long before spring has really arrived. There are the bulbs, of course, which one has carefully plunged in ashes or placed in a dark cupboard, according to the instructions in the garden books and catalogues: but somehow there is something a little artificial about any flower which has been compelled to bloom before its time. Even though we may not number ourselves among the rich who languidly fill their rooms on an order to the florist with lilac at Christmas and tulips on New Year's Day, there is still, I think, a great difference between the flowers which we force and those which we have the patience to wait for at their proper season. For one thing, the forced flower always slightly spoils our delight in its outdoor successor when it normal arrives; and for another, the forced flower itself, however welcome, is always something of a fake. To the true lover of flowers, these arguments are disturbingly potent.