The Vegetable

The Vegetable F. Scott Fitzgerald
The Vegetable F. Scott Fitzgerald
The Vegetable F. Scott Fitzgerald
The Vegetable F. Scott Fitzgerald
Photo Jan 26, 7 24 59 AM.jpg
The Vegetable F. Scott Fitzgerald
The Vegetable F. Scott Fitzgerald
The Vegetable F. Scott Fitzgerald
The Vegetable F. Scott Fitzgerald
Photo Jan 26, 7 24 59 AM.jpg

The Vegetable

200.00

F. Scott Fitzgerald | New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1923.

First Edition. No dust jacket. Book in good/very good condition with tanned pages consistent with age.

The Vegetable (1923) is F. Scott Fitzgerald's only full-length play about the comic misadventures of a unhappily married railroad clerk who unexpectedly becomes President of the United States on his road to becoming a postman.The play's text was published in book form by Scribners on April 27, 1923, in a print run of 7,650 copies, and was generally well-received in print. However, when the play premiered at Nixon's Apollo Theater in Atlantic City, rumor has it that it flopped so badly that the Fitzgeralds and their friends left before the final act. Though Fitzgerald had said he was proud of the work, after the performance, he fell into a deep depression.

 

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This is the “living” room of Jerry Frost’s house. It is evening. The room (and, by implication, the house) is small and stuffyit’s an awful bother to raise these old-fashioned windows; some of them stick, and besides it’s extravagant to let in much cold air, here in the middle of March. I can’t say much for the furniture, either. Some of it’s instalment stuff, imitation leather with the grain painted on as an after-effect, and some of it’s dingily, depressingly old. That bookcase held “Ben Hur” when it was a best-seller, and it’s now trying to digest “A Library of the World’s Best Literature” and the “Wit and Humor of the United States in Six Volumes.” That couch would be dangerous to sit upon without a map showing the location of all craters, hillocks, and thistle-patches. And three dead but shamefully unburied clocks stare eyelessly before them from their perches around the walls.